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  • Nov 02 / 2020
What's New

2021 Pension, Other COLAs Announced

401(k), 403(b), 457(b) Pre-Tax Contribution Limit Remains $19,500 for 2021

The IRS has announced the changes to the dollar limits on benefits and contributions under qualified retirement plans, as well as other items, for tax year 2021 [Notice 2020-79, 10-26-20].

IRC §415, which provides for dollar limits on benefits and contributions under qualified retirement plans, also requires that the IRS annually adjust these limits for cost-of-living changes. The IRC also requires various other amounts to be adjusted at the same time and in the same manner as these dollar limits.

  • The limitation on the exclusion for elective deferrals under §402(g)(1) (e.g., §401(k) and §403(b) plans) remains unchanged at $19,500.
  • The limit on annual additions to defined contribution plans under §415(c)(1)(A) increases to $58,000 (from $57,000).
  • The limit on the annual benefit under a defined benefit plan contained in §415(b)(1)(A) remains unchanged at $230,000.
  • The annual compensation limit under §401(a)(17), §404(l), §408(k)(3)(C), and §408(k)(6)(D)(ii) increases to $290,000 (from $285,000).
  • The compensation amount under §408(p)(2)(E) regarding elective deferrals to SIMPLE retirement accounts remains unchanged at $13,500.
  • The limitation under §457(e)(15) concerning elective deferrals to deferred compensation plans of state and local governments and tax-exempt organizations (§457(b) plans) remains unchanged at $19,500.
  • The limitation under §416(i)(1)(A)(i) concerning the definition of “key employee” in a top-heavy plan remains unchanged at $185,000.
  • The limitation under §414(v)(2)(B)(i) for catch-up contributions to §§401(k), 403(b), and 457(b) plans for individuals age 50 or over remains unchanged at $6,500; the limitation under §414(v)(2)(B)(ii) for catch-up contributions to an employer’s SIMPLE plan for individuals age 50 or over remains unchanged at $3,000.
  • The limitation used in the definition of “highly compensated employee” under §414(q)(1)(B) remains unchanged at $130,000.
  • The compensation amount under §408(k)(2)(C) regarding simplified employee pensions (SEPs) increases to $650 (from $600).
  • The compensation amount under Treas. Reg. §1.61-21(f)(5)(i), concerning the definition of “control employee” for fringe benefit valuation purposes, remains unchanged at $115,000. The compensation amount under §1.61-21(f)(5)(iii) increases to $235,000 (from $230,000).
  • The limit on annual contributions to an Individual Retirement Arrangement, remains unchanged at $6,000. The additional catch-up contribution limit for individuals aged 50 and over is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $1,000.

IRS Announces 2021 COLAs for Transportation Fringes, FSA Deferrals, Foreign Earned Income Exclusion, and More

The IRS has also released inflation-adjusted tables for 2021 reflecting any increases in the FSA deferral limit, foreign earned income exclusion, and excludable transportation fringes, among other changes [Rev. Proc. 2020-45, 10-26-20].

Qualified transportation fringes

The amounts that may be excluded from gross income for employer-provided qualified transportation fringe benefits (transportation in a commuter highway vehicle and any transit pass) and qualified parking for 2021 both remain at $270.

Health flexible spending arrangements

For plan years beginning in 2021, the dollar limitation under IRC §125(i) on voluntary employee salary reductions for contributions to health flexible spending arrangements remains at $2,750. For cafeteria plans that permit the carryover of unused amounts, the maximum carryover amount is $550.

Standard deduction

The standard deduction amounts for 2021 increase to $25,100 for married couples filing jointly or surviving spouses ($24,800 in 2020), $12,550 for single taxpayers and married taxpayers filing separately ($12,400 in 2020), and $18,800 for heads of household ($18,650 in 2020).

Federal tax levies

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act altered the way the amount of wages, salary, or other income exempt from a federal tax levy is calculated. For taxable years beginning in 2021, the dollar amount used to calculate the amount determined under IRC §6334(d)(4)(B) remains unchanged at $4,300.

Foreign earned income exclusion

For 2021, the maximum foreign earned income exclusion amount under IRC §911(b)(2)(D)(i) is $108,700 (up from $107,600 in 2020). The maximum amount of the foreign housing cost exclusion is $15,218 (up from $15,064 in 2020).

Medical Savings Accounts

To be eligible to make contributions to a Medical Savings Account (or to have the employer make the contributions), an employee must be covered by a high deductible health plan. For 2021, a high deductible health plan is a plan with an annual deductible of $2,400-$3,600 for individual coverage (up from $2,350-$3,550 in 2020) and $4,800-$7,150 for family coverage (up from $4,750-$7,100 in 2020).

Maximum out-of-pocket expenses can be no more than $4,800 for individual coverage (up from $4,750 in 2020) and $8,750 for family coverage (up from $8,650 in 2020).

Long-term care insurance benefits

If a long-term care insurance contract makes per diem benefit payments, the amount of the payments that is excluded from income in 2021 is capped at $400 per day (up from $380 in 2020).

Adoption assistance

For 2021, the maximum amount that can be excluded from an employee’s gross income for qualified adoption expenses under an employer’s adoption assistance program is $14,440 (up from $14,300 in 2020). The maximum amount that can be excluded in connection with the adoption of a child with special needs is $14,440 (up from $14,300 in 2020).

The amount excludable from an employee’s gross income begins to phase out for taxpayers with adjusted gross income of $216,660 (up from $214,520 in 2020) and is completely phased out for taxpayers with adjusted gross income of $256,660 (up from $254,520 in 2020).

Qualified small employer HRA

For 2021, a qualified small employer health reimbursement arrangement (QSEHRA) is an arrangement which, among other requirements, makes payments and reimbursements for qualifying medical care expenses of an eligible employee that do not exceed $5,300 (up from $5,250 for 2020), or $10,700 in the case of an arrangement that also provides for payments or reimbursements for family members of the employee (up from $10,600 for 2020).

Pipeline construction industry per diem option

For 2021, an eligible employer may pay certain welders and heavy equipment mechanics up to $18 per hour for rig-related expenses that will be deemed substantiated under an accountable plan (unchanged from 2020) and up to $11 per hour for fuel (unchanged from 2020), when paid in accordance with Rev. Proc. 2002-41 (2002-23 IRB 1098).

Courtesy of the APA

  • Aug 19 / 2020
What's New

IRS Announces 2021 Health Savings Account Contribution Limits, Still Time To Make 2019 And 2020 HSA Contributions


Forbes.com

The Internal Revenue Service announced new, higher contribution limits for health savings accounts for 2021 today. You’ll be allowed to contribute $3,600 for individual coverage for 2021, up from $3,550 for 2020, or $7,200 for family coverage, up from $7,100 for 2020.

In the meantime, you can still top off health savings account contributions for 2019 through the Covid-19-related extended tax day deadline of July 15, 2020. And it’s as good a time as ever to check that your contributions for the 2020 calendar year are on track.

While more and more Americans are opening up these triple-tax-advantaged accounts, few are fully embracing the potential tax savings they offer. Some accounts go unfunded. And only 6% of accountholders choose to invest the money they contribute, according to the Employee Benefit Research Institute.

Recommended For You

Is it really worth the hassle of keeping track of a savings and investing account dedicated to healthcare? Absolutely. With an HSA, you save whether you use the money in the account for current out-of-pocket healthcare expenses, or invest it with the intention of using it to help cover your healthcare costs in retirement.

You can even used an HSA to save on a typical trip to the CVS. Thanks to a tax relief provision tucked in the last Covid-19 stimulus package, you can use money you stash in an HSA or FSA (more on those later) for over-the-counter medications like Tylenol or Flonase as well as menstrual products like tampons and pads. That reverses Obamacare restrictions on OTC meds requiring a doctor’s prescription for them to be eligible for reimbursement. Lively, an upstart HSA and FSA provider, has an updated list of eligible expenses here.

As of January 2020, there were 29.4 million HSAs, holding $71.7 billion in assets, according to the 2019 Year-End Devenir HSA Research Report. Contributions and asset growth has been accelerating. As of year-end 2019, investment account holders had a $16,012 total balance on average, Devenir found.

Most HSAs are offered as an employee benefit. But Lively and Fidelity Investments also offer fee-free individual HSAs for self-employed folks, independent contractors and gig workers.

Here are the details on how HSAs work. You put money in on a taxfree basis (usually through salary deferrals), it builds up tax free (you can invest it), and it comes out taxfree to cover out-of-pocket healthcare expenses.

You can contribute to an HSA if you’re in a qualifying high-deductible health plan. (For 2021, that means a plan with a minimum annual deductible of $1,400 for individual coverage or $2,800 for family coverage.) If you’ll be 55 or older by December 31, you can sock away an additional $1,000 for that year. (That catch-up amount isn’t subject to inflation adjustments.) If you’re married, have family coverage and your spouse will be 55 by the end of the year, he or she can also put away the $1,000 catch-up—but only into his or her own HSA, which can be set up specifically to accept these contributions. Here’s a link to the IRS Revenue Procedure 2020-32with the official numbers.

At a minimum, you should put enough money in your HSA to cover your annual health plan deductible. If you lowballed your annual contribution, you can top it off up until the tax year filing deadline. Say you get a big unexpected doctor’s bill. You can put money into your HSA, take it right out, and the government just paid maybe 25% of the bill. The higher your tax bracket, the bigger your savings.

A savvy strategy for high-income earners is to invest the money in your HSA for the long haul. Once you’re 65, you can take out taxfree distributions to cover Medicare premiums. If you withdraw money at that point for non-medical uses, you pay the same tax as you would on withdrawals from a pretax 401(k). But you can also take money out tax-free to reimburse yourself for prior years’ out-of-pocket medical expenses if you have the old receipts.

Note HSAs are a different beast than healthcare FSAs (sometimes confusingly called health spending accounts). FSAs have lower contribution limits and are riskier because you have to spend the money down in one year or you forfeit it (some FSAs have a $500 carryover provision). By contrast, the money you put in an HSA is yours to keep forever: you can spend it when you want. If you have an HSA-eligible health plan, you can’t also put away money in a regular FSA but you can put money in a limited FSA for dental and vision care expenses only.

See also, IRS Covid-19 Fix For Workplace Health And Dependent Care Flexible Spending Accounts: Mid-Year Changes Now Allowed.

  • Aug 18 / 2020
What's New

IRS Releases Revised Form 941 for COVID-19-Related Tax Relief


The IRS released a revised Form 941, Employer’s Quarterly Federal Tax Return, and its instructions to be used beginning with the second quarter of 2020 (due July 31, 2020). The form has been updated to accommodate reporting of COVID-19-related employment tax credits and other relief.

The revised Form 941 includes lines to report the:

  • Credit for qualified sick leave and expanded family and medical leave wages
  • Employee retention credit
  • Deferrals of the employer share of social security tax during the quarter
  • Credits received from filing Form 7200, Advance Payment of Employer Credits Due to COVID-19, for the quarter

The revised instructions include a new Worksheet 1, which will be used to figure the credit for qualified sick and family leave wages. The credit will then be reported on Lines 11c and 13d of the Form 941.

  • Aug 13 / 2020
What's New

3 Deceptively Easy Mistakes to Make if You Deferred Your Deposits of Social Security Taxes


The IRS released Form 941 instructions and instructions to Schedule B for the second, third and fourth quarters of 2020 in late June. Several issues have now arisen with the deferral of the employer’s 6.2% share of Social Security taxes.

Designating Deferrals

Although employers can’t defer a deposit of Social Security taxes they’ve already made, employers may be able to claw back some of the deferral from taxes already deposited by designating those funds as employees’ withheld income and FICA taxes and the employer’s portion of Medicare taxes.

Why:The Form 941 instructions state that regardless of how deposits are identified for EFTPS purposes, employers can consider prior deposits during a quarter as first being deposited for employment taxes other than the employer’s share of Social Security taxes.

The IRS used strikingly similar language to define “federal employment taxes” in its FAQs on claiming pandemic-related tax credits. There, the IRS defined the phrase as including employees’ withheld income and FICA taxes and your portion of Medicare taxes.

Makeup Deposits

Employers must repay half the deferral by Dec. 31, 2021, and the other half by Dec. 31, 2022. According to the IRS, payments made before Dec. 31, 2021, are first applied against payments due on Dec. 31, 2021, and then applied against the payment due on Dec. 31, 2022.

Upshot:If the deferral is more than the deposit, the makeup deposit may not be split evenly; the lion’s share may need to be paid by Dec. 31, 2022.

Flip side: If the deferral is less than the deposit, nothing would be due Dec. 31, 2021, and everything would be due Dec. 31, 2022.

Corporate Deductions

If employers choose to defer their deposits of Social Security taxes, corporate deductions for those taxes are also deferred.
This is courtesy of the Payroll Legal Alert found in the APA website

 

  • Aug 13 / 2020
What's New

President Signs Memorandums Deferring Payroll Tax Obligations


On August 8, 2020, President Trump signed memorandums directing the Secretary of the Treasury “to defer the withholding, deposit, and payment” of the employee share of social security tax on wages paid between September 1 and December 31, 2020.

The Memorandum on Deferring Payroll Tax Obligations in Light of the Ongoing COVID-19 Disaster.

8/8/2020 Memorandum on Deferring Payroll Tax Obligations in Light of the Ongoing COVID-19 Disaster
MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY
SUBJECT: Deferring Payroll Tax Obligations in Light
of the Ongoing COVID-19 Disaster
By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of
America, it is hereby ordered as follows:
Section 1. Policy. The 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) that originated in the People’s Republic
of China has caused significant, sudden, and unexpected disruptions to the American economy. On
March 13, 2020, I determined that the COVID-19 pandemic is of suicient severity and magnitude to
warrant an emergency declaration under section 501(b) of the Robert T. Staord Disaster Relief and
Emergency Assistance Act, 42 U.S.C. 5121-5207, and that is still the case today. American workers
have been particularly hard hit by this ongoing disaster. While the Department of the Treasury has
already undertaken historic eorts to alleviate the hardships of our citizens, it is clear that further
temporary relief is necessary to support working Americans during these challenging times. To
that end, today I am directing the Secretary of the Treasury to use his authority to defer certain
payroll tax obligations with respect to the American workers most in need. This modest, targeted
action will put money directly in the pockets of American workers and generate additional
incentives for work and employment, right when the money is needed most.
PRESIDENTIAL MEMORANDA
Memorandum on Deferring Payroll Tax Obligations
in Light of the Ongoing COVID-19 Disaster
BUDGET & SPENDING
Issued on: August 8, 2020
★ ★ ★8/8/2020 Memorandum on Deferring Payroll Tax Obligations in Light of the Ongoing COVID-19 Disaster | The White House
https://www.whitehouse.gov/presidential-actions/memorandum-deferring-payroll-tax-obligations-light-ongoing-covid-19-disaster/ 2/3
Sec. 2. Deferring Certain Payroll Tax Obligations. The Secretary of the Treasury is hereby directed
to use his authority pursuant to 26 U.S.C. 7508A to defer the withholding, deposit, and payment of
the tax imposed by 26 U.S.C. 3101(a), and so much of the tax imposed by 26 U.S.C. 3201 as is
attributable to the rate in eect under 26 U.S.C. 3101(a), on wages or compensation, as applicable,
paid during the period of September 1, 2020, through December 31, 2020, subject to the following
conditions:
(a) The deferral shall be made available with respect to any employee the amount of whose wages
or compensation, as applicable, payable during any bi-weekly pay period generally is less than
$4,000, calculated on a pre-tax basis, or the equivalent amount with respect to other pay periods.
(b) Amounts deferred pursuant to the implementation of this memorandum shall be deferred
without any penalties, interest, additional amount, or addition to the tax.
Sec. 3. Authorizing Guidance. The Secretary of the Treasury shall issue guidance to implement this
memorandum.
Sec. 4. Tax Forgiveness. The Secretary of the Treasury shall explore avenues, including legislation,
to eliminate the obligation to pay the taxes deferred pursuant to the implementation of this
memorandum.
Sec. 5. General Provisions. (a) Nothing in this memorandum shall be construed to impair or
otherwise aect:
(i) the authority granted by law to an executive department or agency, or the head thereof; or
(ii) the functions of the Director of the Oice of Management and Budget relating to budgetary,
administrative, or legislative proposals.
(b) This memorandum shall be implemented consistent with applicable law and subject to the
availability of appropriations.
(c) This memorandum is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or
procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments,
agencies, or entities, its oicers, employees, or agents, or any other person. 8/8/2020 Memorandum on Deferring Payroll Tax Obligations in Light of the Ongoing COVID-19 Disaster | The White House
https://www.whitehouse.gov/presidential-actions/memorandum-deferring-payroll-tax-obligations-light-ongoing-covid-19-disaster/ 3/3
(d) You are authorized and directed to publish this memorandum in the Federal Register.
DONALD J. TRUMP

  • Jul 15 / 2020
What's New

IRS Allows Flexibility in §125 Plan Rules for 2020; Increases Maximum FSA Carryover

The IRS is allowing employers to extend the claim period for flexible spending arrangements (FSAs) and dependent care assistance programs and also allowing employees to make mid-year changes to §125 cafeteria plans [IR-2020-95, 5-12-20]. The changes may be applied retroactively to January 1, 2020. This guidance is due to COVID-19.

The IRS also raised the maximum carryover amount for health FSAs from $500 to $550 [Notice 2020-33]. This permanent change will be based on inflation indexing, which is used to determine the limit on salary reduction contributions under §125 cafeteria plans.

Mid-Year Elections Allowed

The IRS is allowing mid-year changes to elections during 2020 to §125 cafeteria plans for eligible employees. Employers may allow employees to:

  • Make a new election on a prospective basis, if the employee initially declined to elect employer-sponsored health coverage
  • Revoke an existing election and make a new election to enroll in different health coverage sponsored by the same employer on a prospective basis
  • Revoke an existing election, provided that the employee attests in writing that the employee is enrolled or immediately will enroll in other health coverage

Employees may also revoke an election, make a new election, or decrease or increase an existing FSA election for health or dependent care assistance.

Courtesy of APA.

  • Jul 15 / 2020
What's New

IRS Releases Guidance on Form W-2 Reporting of FFCRA Qualified Leave

The IRS released guidance on how employers must report the amount of emergency sick leave wages and expanded family leave wages (together, qualified leave) paid to employees under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) between April 1 and December 31, 2020 [Notice 2020-54, 7-8-20].

Employers are required to report these amounts either on Form W-2, Wage and Tax Statement, in Box 14 (Other), or on a separate statement. The notice instructs employers how to separately label the qualified leave. The notice also includes language employers may use for employee instructions to provide additional information about qualified leave wages.

Using Separate Statements

If an employer uses a separate statement to report the wages, and the employee receives a paper Form W-2, then the statement must be included with the Form W-2 provided to the employee. If the employee receives an electronic Form W-2, then the statement should be provided in the same manner and at the same time as the Form W-2.

Courtesy of the APA

  • Jul 15 / 2020
What's New

IRS Requires Separate Reporting of FFCRA Wages on 2020 Forms W-2

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) issued Notice 2020-54, which requires employers to separately report Qualified Sick Leave Wages and Qualified Family Leave Wages paid under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act[1](FFCRA) on 2020 Forms W-2, Box 14, or on a separate statement.

This reporting is intended to provide employees who are also self-employed with information necessary to properly claim any FFCRA sick or family leave credits. There are three types of paid sick or family leave wages that should be separately reported (if applicable) in Box 14:

  • Sick leave wages subject to the $511 per day limit because of care the employee required;
  • Sick leave wages subject to the $200 per day limit because of care the employee provided to others; and
  • Emergency family leave wages up to $200 per day and $10,000 in the aggregate.

Background

The FFCRA requires employers with fewer than 500 employees to provide paid leave if an employee is unable to work or telework due to circumstances related to COVID-19. Paid leave requirements and the related tax credit vary depending on the reason for leave:

  1. Sick leave wages up to $511 per day ($5,110 in the aggregate) because of care required for the employee; i.e., the employee:
    • is subject to a federal, state or local quarantine or isolation order related to COVID-19;
    • has been advised by a health-care provider to self-quarantine due to concerns related to COVID-19;
    • is experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 and seeking a medical diagnosis;
  2. Sick leave wages at two-thirds of the employee’s regular rate of pay, up to $200 per day and $2,000 in the aggregate, for care that the employee provided to others; i.e., the employee:
    • is caring for an individual who is subject to a quarantine or isolation order related to COVID-19, or has been advised by a health-care provider to self-quarantine related to COVID-19;
    • is caring for a son or daughter if the school or child-care facility has been closed or the child-care provider is unavailable due to COVID-19; or
    • is experiencing any other substantially similar condition specified by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).[2]
  3. Expanded paid family and medical leave at two-thirds of the employee’s regular rate of pay, to a limit of $200 per day and $10,000 in aggregate, if the employee is unable to work or telework because the employee is caring for a son or daughter whose school or child-care facility is closed related to COVID-19.

FFCRA Tax Credits Fully Offset Paid Leave

Eligible private-sector employers are entitled to fully refundable tax credits toward employment taxes to cover the cost of FFCRA leave, including qualified sick and family leave wages, plus allocable qualified health-plan expenses. FFCRA wages are exempt from employer Social Security taxes but are subject to employer Medicare taxes. However, the tax credit is increased by the employer’s share of Medicare tax on qualified leave wages.

Reporting Requirements

In order to provide self-employed individuals who also receive wages or compensation as employees with the information they need to properly claim any qualified sick or family leave credits for which they are eligible, IRS Notice 2020-54 requires employers to report to employees the amount of qualified sick leave wages and qualified family leave wages paid to the employees.

Self-employed individuals are also eligible for a refundable tax credit for qualified sick and family leave amounts. If a self-employed individual is eligible for a refundable credit for FFCRA sick leave and also receives qualified sick leave wages as an employee, the credit amount for the self-employed individual is reduced.

FFCRA amounts must be separately reported either in Box 14 of Form W-2 or on a separate statement, with the following descriptions (or similar language):

  • Sick leave wages paid because of care required for the employee; described as “sick leave wages subject to the $511 per day limit.”
  • Sick leave wages for care the employee provided to others, described as “sick leave wages subject to the $200 per day limit.”
  • Qualified family leave wages, described as “emergency family leave wages.

Employers must separately state each of these wage amounts either on Form W-2, Box 14 or on a separate statement. If a separate statement is provided and the employee receives a paper Form W-2, the statement must be included with the Form W-2 sent to the employee.  If the employee receives an electronic Form W-2, then the statement must be provided in the same manner and at the same time as the Form W-2.

Model Language for Employee Instructions

As part of the Instructions for Employee, under the instructions for Box 14, for Forms W-2 or in a separate statement sent to the employee, the employer may provide additional information about qualified sick and family leave wages and explain that these wages may limit the amount of credits to which the employee may be entitled with respect to any self-employment income. The following model language (modified as necessary) may be used:

“Included in Box 14, if applicable, are amounts paid to you as qualified sick leave wages or qualified family leave wages under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act. Specifically, up to three types of paid qualified sick leave wages or qualified family leave wages are reported in Box 14:

  • Sick leave wages subject to the $511 per day limit because of care you required;
  • Sick leave wages subject to the $200 per day limit because of care you provided to another; and
  • Emergencyfamily leave wages.

If you have self-employment income in addition to wages paid by your employer, and you intend to claim any qualified sick leave or qualified family leave equivalent credits, you must report the qualified sick leave or qualified family leave wages on Form 7202, Credits for Sick Leave and Family Leave for Certain Self-Employed Individuals, included with your income tax return and reduce any qualified sick leave or qualified family leave equivalent credits by the amount of these qualified leave wages.”

For further information, see IRS Notice 2020-59.
Courtesy of “ADP”

  • Jul 15 / 2020
What's New

IRS Releases Revised Form 941 for COVID-19-Related Tax Relief

 

The IRS released a revised Form 941Employer’s Quarterly Federal Tax Return, and its instructions to be used beginning with the second quarter of 2020 (due July 31, 2020). The form has been updated to accommodate reporting of COVID-19-related employment tax credits and other relief.

The revised Form 941 includes lines to report the:

  • Credit for qualified sick leave and expanded family and medical leave wages 
  • Employee retention credit
  • Deferrals of the employer share of social security tax during the quarter
  • Credits received from filing Form 7200Advance Payment of Employer Credits Due to COVID-19, for the quarter

The revised instructions include a new Worksheet 1, which will be used to figure the credit for qualified sick and family leave wages. The credit will then be reported on Lines 11c and 13d of the Form 941.

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